ecoGeeks Hose Filter Contaminants Removed

The ecoGeeks Hose Filter is a combination of granular activated carbon (GAC) and a reduction/oxidation media that is classified by the EPA as a bacteriostatic. The combined media reduces or eliminates these contaminants:

ARSENIC
DRINKING WATER STANDARDS AND HEALTH RISKS:
The primary drinking water standard for arsenic is 0.05 milligrams per liter. Arsenic accumulates in body tissues. In high concentrations, arsenic can damage the digestive tract, heart and circulation. Studies suggest that arsenic is associated with skin cancer. Studies also indicate that arsenic in small amounts may be an essential element for normal human development
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Arsenic contamination of water is most often caused by leachate from solid waste landfills, or from use of pesticides.

BARIUM
DRINKING WATER STANDARDS AND HEALTH RISKS:
The primary drinking water standard for barium is 1.0 milligrams per liter. Small doses are not harmful. Large amounts can cause increased blood pressure, nerve damage or cardiovascular disease.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Barium pollution may come from natural sources or can enter water supplies through industrial waste discharges.

CADMIUM
DRINKING WATER STANDARDS AND HEALTH RISKS:
The primary drinking water standard for cadmium is 0.01 milligrams per liter. Cadmium in high concentrations can cause short-term intestinal illness. Since cadmium tends to accumulate in the body, long-term effects may occur, including intestinal, lung and kidney damage.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Cadmium contamination may be caused by disposal of waste from photographic, metal plating or pesticide manufacturing industries. The most common source of contamination is from the corrosion by acidic water of galvanized pipes or soldered joints in copper pipes.

CALCITES AND LIME/SCALE:

The ecoGeeks Hose Filter alters the molecular structure of calcite which inhibits its clinging capability. Calcium ions are removed from the water which changes calcite lime/scale deposits into aragonite. This alteration causes the lime/scale to remain suspended in the water where it cannot cling to equipment.

CHLORINE
DRINKING WATER STANDARD AND HEALTH RISKS:
Most water municipal suppliers add up to 4 parts per million chlorine as a disinfectant to drinking water to kill germs such as giardia and e coli. Especially after heavy rainstorms, your water supplier may add additional chlorine to guarantee that these germs are killed.

POTENTIAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS:
Chlorine, while it’s extremely useful as a disinfectant in pool, spa and water treatment, can cause eye, nose and respiratory irritation.

Chlorine can cause environmental harm at low levels. It is especially harmful to to organisms living in soil such as beneficial bacteria. Harming these soil-borne organisms can cause soil to harden, increase soil erosion and make lawns and gardens more difficult to manage with increased need for fertilizers. Perennials, flowering plants, fruit trees, shrubs can be damaged both through their ability to photosynthesize and absorb nutrients through their root system.

CHROMIUM
DRINKING WATER STANDARD AND HEALTH RISKS:
The primary drinking water standard for chromium is 0.05 milligrams per liter. Chromium in small amounts is essential to health. People who work with chromium or are exposed to amounts over the standard for a long time are at risk of damage to the skin and respiratory system, or to acute poisoning.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Chromium contamination of water is caused by disposal of industrial waste, particularly from the metal plating, tanning and textile industries.

LEAD
DRINKING WATER STANDARD AND HEALTH RISKS:
Lead in amounts over the primary drinking water standard of 0.015 milligrams per liter may cause nervous system disorders and brain or kidney damage. Since lead accumulates in body tissue, it is especially hazardous to the fetus or to children under three years old.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Most lead contamination of drinking water occurs when soft acidic water corrodes lead or galvanized pipes or corrodes solder used in pipe fittings. Lead from solder can be confirmed by testing to see if tin is also present. Lead is used in insecticides and in high octane gasoline. Lead contamination may be present in water from industrial waste disposal or landfill leachate.

MERCURY
DRINKING WATER STANDARD AND HEALTH RISKS:
The primary drinking water standard for mercury is 0.002 milligrams per liter. Mercury can cause acute poisoning in a large dose. Since mercury accumulates in body tissues, it can cause chronic effects to the nervous system, kidney or intestines at low doses over a long period of time. Mercury compounds become concentrated in the tissues of fish; therefore, fish taken from mercury polluted water should not be eaten.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Mercury contamination of water is caused by industrial or agricultural wastes.

SELENIUM
DRINKING WATER STANDARD AND HEALTH RISKS:
Selenium in small amounts is beneficial to health. Levels over the primary drinking water standard of 0.01 milligrams per liter may cause nervous system disorders, skin problems and in extreme cases may be fatal.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Selenium occurs naturally in drinking water, though in trace amounts only. It can also form in higher concentrations in some soils. Selenium is a by-product of copper refining.

SILVER
DRINKING WATER STANDARD AND HEALTH RISKS:
Amounts of silver in drinking water over the drinking water standard of 0.05 milligrams per liter may cause a permanent blue-gray discoloration of eyes, skin and mucous membranes.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Only trace amounts of silver are found naturally in drinking water. Silver contamination of water can be caused by disposal of industrial waste, including waste from metal plating and photographic processing industries.

ZINC
DRINKING WATER STANDARD AND HEALTH RISKS:
The secondary drinking water standard for zinc is 5 milligrams per liter. Zinc levels above this standard may give water a chalky appearance and bad taste. The presence of zinc in drinking water does not generally present health risks and in small amounts is essential to health.
POSSIBLE SOURCE OF CONTAMINATION:
Zinc can occur naturally in drinking water. Zinc contamination can result from corrosion of galvanized pipes by soft, acidic water. Zinc is used in fertilizers and may be found in landfill leachate or in industrial wastes.

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